"I was first diagnosed with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia in 2011 as a university student. The diagnosis was a result of blood tests, which my GP sent me for because of other severe health problems. I wasn’t expecting anything to do with cancer.

It was very difficult for me to accept my disability at the beginning, as I did not fully understand what would happen next and had other scary thoughts running through my mind. With the help of my specialist Macmillan nurse I got to know more about my illness, what needed to be done and what changes would take place in my life.

My treatment started almost immediately after being admitted to St George's Hospital in Tooting, London. I was given drug therapy, which included high dose chemo and tablets. As I had other health problems apart from the leukaemia I had to stop my degree and concentrate on treatment and therapy sessions to deal with my fear and stress. I had to attend hospital appointments twice a week for two years and that was very intense for me.

“I have now come to terms with my health situation and am much happier in myself. I believe I can still achieve so many things in my life regardless of treatment and days I feel weak and ill.

The last few years have been very difficult as I've been receiving treatment and trying to concentrate on having a degree. I applied to enter higher education again after a year of treatment to keep me busy and to stop me from thinking about my illness as it was deteriorating instead of getting better.

I do not have family and  have to support myself, but having treatment left me with limited energy to find work and carry out daily activities. My disability has also put me on a position of struggling financially even though I do receive Disability Living Allowance.

There have been many times when I've been asked by my doctors to stop education again and concentrate on my health and treatment. I took weeks off but started studying from home. I have continued doing that and am proud of myself for becoming a graduate in spite of my poor health.

Receiving £300 from Leukaemia UK is going to help me so much with travel in and out of various hospital, psychiatric and dietician appointments to help me deal with my disability. I am still receiving treatment, as it will be an ongoing thing to keep me strong and living.

I have now come to terms with my health situation and am much happier in myself. I believe I can still achieve so many things in my life regardless of treatment and days I feel weak and ill."

Help Leukaemia UK continue to support people like Debbie by donating here.